I want employees who are emotionally invested in the success of my business

The title of this article was a statement I read recently in an article on the web. There are lot of articles of this nature on the web so the topic is quite recognised. A lot of these articles mix into other subjects, one of those subjects being money.

The title of the topic basically becomes …

I want employees who are emotionally invested in making my company lots of money but I only want to pay them an average or below average salary. Who the hell is going to be emotionally invested that much in the success of your company unless you make it worth their while?

The same people who are sprouting this garbage are the same people who state “do not work for money, work for success” or something of a similar nature. The kind of success these employers are expecting are what I call “life work” success.

To explain, “life work” is something that a lot of people will do in there spare time unless they are lucky enough to be doing it full time. The people who are doing “life work” are people who invent something groundbreaking or write one of the best novels of the century.

George R. R. Martin the person who wrote Game of Thrones which is now a huge success spent years and years of his life writing the novel. This is not something that he is just going to do for some company for an average salary and most likely this is not something he going to do for any company no matter the salary.

When people talk about not working for the money and working for success, this is what they are talking about. It is not something that can be transfered to Uncle Bobs Print Business. This is what Uncle Bob is expecting however and all the people spouting the above garbage, he is wanting the “life work” of someone like George R. R. Martin for the peanuts he is paying him to work for his local print shop.

Somewhere along the line these employers have mixed “life work” and “everyday work” together. They want the benefits of someones “life work” but they cannot have it.

So lets take it a level down. Lets say Uncle Bob is not expecting the “life work” of some individual but is just wanting the same level of emotional investment he himself puts into his business. Right OK, Uncle Bob, how much are you going to have to pay that employee to put in the same level of effort as yourself?

To get the employee emotionally invested to that level he is going to have be like yourself. He is going to have to have a similar level of shares in the business as yourself or alternatively a wage that reflects that many shares.

Uncle Bob wants an employee who will do 100% high standard work, all the time. An employee who will stay late into the night most nights, if required. An employee who will pitch in to help with the administrative and accouting areas of the business after the normal days workload is complete. To expect this level of employee and get this level of employee at an average or below wage is unlikely to happen.

“According to The Intelligence Group, 64% of Millennials would rather earn $40,000 a year at a job they love than $100,000 a year at a job they find unfulfilling. That’s a pretty significant statistic.”

I read the following on a website preaching about the emotional investment of employees. The above in a way kind of backfires on itself because what kind of job are employees most likely to find “unfulfilling”, the kind of jobs where Uncle Bobs are wanting a high level of emotional investment i.e. staying late, high standards without fail, helping into admin / account areas of business after hours.

The exact kind of unfulfilling roles are the exact kind of roles that employers in this article are wanting their employees to invest in. So I am not sure what exactly the above quoted statement is getting at? What it seems to be implying is that Uncle Bob can get an emotionally invested employee who is interesting in making his business a success and doing a load of extra tasks to make his business a success for a 60% paycut.

Infact the opposite is the case, Uncle Bob generously agreed to pay said employee $100,000 a year, said employee got fed up with being expected to invest so much of himself into the business so quit the job and took a regular $40,000 year job where so much investment was not required.

I personally believe that companies can get emotionally invested employees. However to get the level of emotional investment the employer requires, shares would have to given to the employee or a wage that reflects that many shares within the company. Obviously the company has to be quite profitable as well as no one is going to invest in the company if it is only making £10,000 profit. The shares and wage reflective of the shares would then not be worth it.

To me it is just basic common sense, if you want an employee to be as emotionally invested as yourself then the “real” incentive has to be there. I think there is general problem in that the business owner should not be expecting the same level of emotional investment from his employees as what he himself has in his own business.

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